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Hockey history nothing new to Seattle

PRESS RELEASE WRITTEN BY NHL PUBLIC RELATIONS; COURTESY NHLmedia.com

 

 

Seattle skyline from West Seattle Bridge 2018 photo by CommunistSquared - Own work via wikipedia commons

PLAYERS BORN IN WASHINGTON STATE, NHL HISTORY

* To date, 14 players born in Washington state have played at least one NHL game (all skaters, no goaltenders).

* Five of those players have appeared in a game during the 2018-19 season: Dylan Gambrell (Bonney Lake), Tyler Johnson (Spokane), T.J. Oshie (Everett), Derek Ryan (Spokane) and Kailer Yamamoto (Spokane).

Tom Bissett is the only one of the 14 players born in the city of Seattle. The other birthplaces: Spokane (7), Aberdeen, Bonney Lake, Ellensburg, Everett, Richland and Tacoma.

 

SEATTLE-AREA YOUTH HOCKEY PARTICIPATION

2017-18

  • Youth players (all genders, ages 18 and under): 1,744
  • Girls players (ages 18 and under): 355
  • Total players (all ages): 4,405

 

2013-14

  • Youth players (all genders, ages 18 and under): 1,301
  • Girls players (ages 18 and under): 156
  • Total players (all ages): 3,519

 

2008-09

  • Youth players (all genders, ages 18 and under): 1,179
  • Girls players (ages 18 and under): 121
  • Total players (all ages): 3,024

 

SEATTLE HOCKEY HISTORY BRIEF

Seattle Metropolitans, 1915-16 to 1923-24
1915-16: The Seattle Metropolitans join the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA), becoming the second U.S.-based team eligible to win the Stanley Cup. (The Portland Rosebuds had become the first the previous season when they relocated from New Westminster).

1916-17: The Metropolitans capture the PCHA championship and meet the NHL-champion Montreal Canadiens, who travel west, in the best-of-five Stanley Cup Final. Seattle wins, 3-1, becoming the first U.S.-based team to claim the title.

1918-19: For the second time in three years the Metropolitans capture the PCHA championship and play host to the Canadiens in the Stanley Cup Final. The series was abandoned after five games (each team 2-2-1) due to the Spanish Influenza epidemic. Canadiens player Joe Hall, hospitalized March 30, 1919, died in a Seattle hospital on April 5. The series was terminated and no Stanley Cup champion was declared for 1918-19.

1919-20: The Metropolitans are PCHA champions and head east to face the Ottawa Senators for the Stanley Cup. Ottawa wins the best-of-five series, 3-2.

1923-24: The Metropolitans play their final season in the PCHA, which disbands prior to the 1924-25 campaign. Two surviving PCHA franchises, the Vancouver Maroons and Victoria Cougars, join the Western Canada Hockey League (WCHL).

Hockey Hall of Fame Inductees who played for the Seattle Metropolitans:
Frank Foyston
Jack Walker
Hap Holmes
Lester Patrick

 

Seattle and Minor Pro Hockey
Seattle-based teams skated in several minor pro leagues from the 1930s through 1970s. The highlight was the decade-long success of the Seattle Totems of the Western Hockey League (WHL) from 1958-68, who appeared in five WHL finals and won three championships in that span.

Hockey Hall of Fame Inductees (Builders) who played for minor pro teams in Seattle:
Keith Allen (also coached in Seattle for nine seasons)
Fred Shero
Emile Francis
Pat Quinn

 

Seattle and Major Junior Hockey, 1977 to Present
The city of Seattle has been the home of a major junior hockey franchise since 1977. Notable alumni of the Seattle Breakers and Seattle Thunderbirds include Mathew BarzalKen DaneykoThomas HickeyTim HunterBrooks LaichPatrick MarleauPetr Nedved and SheaTheodore. Barzal helped the Thunderbirds capture their first WHL title in 2016-17.

1977: Major junior hockey arrives in Seattle when the WCHL Kamloops franchise relocates and becomes the Seattle Breakers in 1977-78. The league is renamed the WHL the following season.

1985: Following the 1984-85 season the Breakers are sold to new owners and renamed the Seattle Thunderbirds.

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