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NHL announces approved rule changes for 2019-20 Season

September 12, 2019

Coach’s Challenge, Video Review among rule changes for 2019-20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New rules and modifications to existing rules are noted below and also highlighted in the 2019-20 NHL Rule Book.

 

Rule 9.6 – Helmets (Page 13)
A player on the ice whose helmet comes off during play shall be assessed a minor penalty if he does not exit the playing surface, or retrieve and replace his helmet properly on his head (with or without his chin strap fastened), within a reasonable period of time. It is reasonable if a player who is making a play on the puck or who is in the vicinity of the puck and engaged in the play at the time his helmet comes off, takes the opportunity to complete the play before either exiting the ice or retrieving and replacing his helmet.

If the player returns to his players’ bench to be substituted for, he may only return to the ice during play with a helmet (with the chin strap properly fastened). No player may exit the penalty bench during play without a helmet (with the chin strap properly fastened). Should he do so, the play shall be stopped once his team has gained control of the puck and a minor penalty shall be assessed to the offending player.

A player who intentionally removes an opponent’s helmet during play shall be assessed a minor penalty for roughing (See Rule 51).

 

 

Rule 20.6 – On-Ice Video Review of Major Penalties (Page 33)

Referees shall review all plays that result in the assessment of any Major Penalty (other than a Major Penalty for Fighting) for the purpose of confirming (or modifying) their original call on the ice.

Such reviews will be conducted exclusively by the Referee(s) on the ice in consultation with other On-Ice Official(s), as appropriate, using the technology (for example, a handheld tablet or a television or computer monitor) specified in and provided pursuant to Rule 38.5.

Communication between the Situation Room and the On-Ice Officials shall be limited to contact between the appropriate Game Logger in the Situation Room and the Referee to ensure the Referee is receiving any and all video they might request, as well as the appropriate replay angles they may need to review the penalty call. There shall be no other contact or consultation between the On-Ice Official(s) and the NHL Situation Room, or with any other non-game participant.

The Referee shall only have the following options following video review of his own call: (i) confirming his original Major Penalty call; or (ii) reducing his original Major Penalty call to a lesser penalty for the same infraction.

 

 

Rule 21.5 – On-Ice Video Review of Match Penalties (Page 34)

Referees shall review all plays that result in the assessment of any Match Penalty for the purpose of confirming (or modifying) their original call on the ice.

Such reviews will be conducted exclusively by the Referee(s) on the ice in consultation with other On-Ice Official(s), as appropriate, using the technology (for example, a handheld tablet or a television or computer monitor) specified in and provided pursuant to Rule 38.5.

Communication between the Situation Room and the On-Ice Officials shall be limited to contact between the appropriate Game Logger in the Situation Room and the Referee to ensure the Referee is receiving any and all video they might request, as well as the appropriate replay angles they may need to review the penalty call. There shall be no other contact or consultation between the On-Ice Official(s) and the NHL Situation Room, or with any other non-game participant.

The Referee shall have the following options following such review: (i) confirming his original Match Penalty call; or (ii) reducing his original Match Penalty call to a lesser penalty for the same infraction.

 

 

Rule 37 – Video Review (Pages 62-65)

37.1 – NHL Situation Room/Video Goal Judge

The NHL will staff a centralized Situation Room with experienced Hockey Operations professionals to watch all games (Regular Season and Playoffs) and to work in conjunction with the On- and Off-Ice Officials in every arena in reviewing all goals and disputed and controversial plays and rendering decisions in accordance with the specific parameters set forth herein.

The NHL will designate an Off-Ice Official to serve in the role of Video Goal Judge in every arena for every game (Regular Season and Playoffs). The Video Goal Judge will be located in a secluded area in the upper level of the building with an unobstructed view of both goals. The location must be large enough to seat four (4) people (Video Goal Judge, Video Technician, Supervisor of Officials and NHL Hockey Operations representative) and must have space for necessary monitors, replay and recording equipment.

The NHL Situation Room and the Video Goal Judge shall both have access to all replays that may be available from all available broadcasts of the game. Both the NHL Situation Room and the Video Goal Judge shall also be equipped with state-of-the-art communications systems that will allow direct and immediate access to the Off-Ice Official(s) at the penalty bench and the On-Ice Official(s).

 

37.2 – Goal Review Procedures

Every goal shall be reviewed by the NHL Situation Room. If there is a need to delay the resumption of the play following an apparent goal, the Off-Ice Official at ice level will be alerted to signal one of the Referees to delay the center-ice face-off for a moment. Once the NHL Situation Room has reviewed the video and confirmed that the goal is valid, the Off-Ice Official at ice level should signal to the Referee to resume play.

If an expanded review is required on any potential goal, the Situation Room shall instruct that the in-arena horn be sounded and the Public Address Announcer will make an announcement that the “play is under review.” Once the play has been reviewed and deemed a goal, the goal will be announced in the normal manner. If the review reveals that the goal should be disallowed, the Referee shall announce the reason for the disallowed goal.

When the NHL Situation Room observes an incident involving a potential goal that was undetected by the On-Ice Officials, the Off-Ice Official will contact the Referee at the first stoppage of play and inform him that a review of the play is in progress. The Public Address Announcer will make an announcement that “the play is under review.” If the review reveals that the goal should be counted, the clock (including penalty time clocks, if applicable) shall be re-set to the time the goal was scored. If the review reveals that no goal was scored, no adjustment to the time clock(s) will be made.

Only one goal can be awarded at any stoppage of play. If an apparent goal was scored by Team A, and is subsequently confirmed as a goal by the NHL Situation Room, any goal scored by Team B during the period of time between the apparent goal by Team A and the stoppage of play (Team B’s goal), the Team B goal would not be awarded. If the apparent goal by Team A is deemed to have entered the goal illegally (e.g., a “distinct kicking motion”), the goal will be disallowed by the NHL Situation Room; no goal will be awarded to Team B either in this circumstance since the play should have been stopped at the time of the apparent goal. The clock (including penalty time clocks, if applicable) shall be re-set to the time of Team A’s apparent goal – whether awarded or disallowed.

Delayed penalties signaled before an apparent goal that is subsequently confirmed as a good goal shall be deemed nullified by the awarding of the goal. (See Rules 16.2 and 18.2) Any penalties signaled during the period of time between the apparent goal and the next stoppage of play shall be assessed and served in the normal course. The time of the penalty will be recorded as the time the awarded goal was actually scored.

When the Referee indicates there is a Video Review in progress, all Players (with the exception of the goalkeepers) should proceed to their respective Players’ Bench immediately, and failure to do so may result in a Game Misconduct penalty for offending Player(s) with a fine to the Coach.

Any potential goal requiring video review must be reviewed prior to and/or during the next stoppage of play. No goal may be awarded (or disallowed) as a result of a Video Review once the puck has been dropped and play has resumed.

The NHL Situation Room will connect directly with the Referee at ice level to assist with the review of any close play or disputed goal. The NHL Situation Room’s decision shall be final.

 

37.3 – Goal Situations Subject to Video Review

The following situations are subject to review by the NHL Situation Room:

(a) Puck crossing the goal line;

(b) Puck in the net prior to the goal frame being dislodged;

(c) Puck in the net prior to (or after) the expiration of time at the end of a period;

(d) With the use of a foot/skate, was a “distinct kicking motion” evident?

(e) Puck deliberately directed, batted, or thrown into the net by an attacking Player by any means (and with any part of his body) other than with his stick;

(f) Puck deflected directly into the net of an On-Ice Official;

(g) Puck struck or deflected into the net with a high-stick, above the height of the crossbar;

(h) Puck entering the net in a proper manner through goal mouth (ensuring puck did not enter net improperly through net meshing or underneath the net frame, etc.);

(i) Puck entering the net as the culmination of a continuous play where the result of the play was unaffected by any whistle blown by the Referee upon his losing sight of the puck; and

(j) The legitimacy of all potential goals on Penalty Shot or Shootout attempts to ensure compliance with applicable rules (e.g., double tap, goalkeeper throwing stick, goalkeeper dislodging goal, shooter cradling puck above the normal height of the shoulders, shooter performing illegal spin-o-rama move, skater’s continued forward advancement of puck, goalkeeper leaving crease prior to puck touch at center ice, etc.)

 

37.4 – Distinct Kicking Motion

Plays that involve a puck entering the net as a direct result of a “distinct kicking motion” shall be ruled NO GOAL. A “distinct kicking motion,” for purposes of Video Review, is one where the video makes clear that an attacking Player has deliberately propelled the puck with a kick of his foot or skate and the puck subsequently enters the net. A goal cannot be scored on a play where an attacking Player propels the puck with his skate into the net (even by means of a subsequent deflection off of another Player) using a “distinct kicking motion.” A goal also cannot be scored on a play where an attacking Player kicks any equipment (stick, glove, helmet, etc.) at the puck, including kicking the blade of his own stick, causing the puck to cross the goal line. A puck that deflects into the net off an attacking Player’s skate who does not use a “distinct kicking motion” shall be ruled a GOAL. A puck that is directed into the net by an attacking Players’ skate shall also be ruled a GOAL, as long as no “distinct kicking motion” is evident. (See also Rule 49.2)

 

37.5 – Puck Struck with a High Stick

The determining factor for High Stick Video Review is where the puck makes contact with the stick in relation to the crossbar. If the puck makes contact with a portion of the stick that is at or below the level of the crossbar (despite some other portion of the stick being above the crossbar) and enters the goal, the goal shall be allowed.

 

37.6 – Video Review to Verify Time on Clock

The NHL Situation Room may use Video Review to establish the correct time on the clock. The “burn in” of the game clock is mandatory for the two overhead goal video feeds, and should be made available by the host broadcaster on as many additional feeds as possible.

Any loss of time on the game or penalty clocks due to a false faceoff, a face-off violation or a puck going out of play must be replaced. The NHL Situation Room may be consulted or may intervene with Onand Off-Ice Officials directly, as appropriate, to ensure that any loss of time on the game or penalty clocks due to these situations is properly replaced. (See also Rule 76.8 and Rule 85.7)

In the event of any dispute regarding time, the matter shall be referred to the NHL Situation Room for adjustment, and its decision shall be final. The Game Timekeeper shall assist to verify game time via an additional timing device (NHL approved stopwatch).

In the event that a Video Review shows that a goal was scored prior to the play being stopped, the NHL Situation Room will inform the Game Timekeeper and Official Scorer of the time of the goal and the amount of playing time left to be re-set on the game clock and penalty time clocks (if applicable). (See Rule 34.7)

Should the NHL Situation Room be able to determine that a goal has been scored through the use of video replay, and play on the ice has nonetheless continued, the NHL Situation Room shall instruct that the in-arena horn be sounded to stop play immediately, and the goal will be awarded. The game clock (and penalty clocks, if applicable) will then be re-set to the time of the goal.

Should the first stoppage of play following an apparent goal coincide with the end of a period, the On-Ice Official(s) will instruct both teams to remain at their respective Players’ Bench until the Video Review of the play can be completed.

 

 

Rule 38 – Coach’s Challenge (Pages 65-69)

Rule 38.1 – General

The video review mechanism triggered by the Coach’s Challenge can only be utilized in GOAL/NO GOAL situations and is intended to be extremely narrow in scope. In all Coach’s Challenge situations, the original call on the ice will be overturned if, and only if, a conclusive and irrefutable determination can be made on the basis of video evidence that the original call on the ice was clearly not correct. If a review is not conclusive and/or there is any doubt whatsoever as to whether the call on the ice was correct, the original call on the ice will be confirmed.

 

Rule 38.2 – Situations Subject to Coach’s Challenge

A team may only request a Coach’s Challenge to review the following scenarios:

(a) “Off-Side” Play Leading to a Goal – A play that results in a “GOAL” call on the ice where the defending team claims that the play should have been stopped by reason of an “Off-Side” infraction by the attacking team (see Rule 83 – Off-Side);

(b) Missed Game Stoppage Event in the Offensive Zone Leading to a Goal – A play that results in a “GOAL” call on the ice where the defending team claims that the play should have been stopped by reason of any play occurring in the offensive zone that should have resulted in a play stoppage but did not; and

(c) Scoring Plays Involving Potential “Interference on the Goalkeeper” – Either: (i) A play that results in a “GOAL” call on the ice where the defending team claims that the goal should have been disallowed due to “Interference on the Goalkeeper” (as described in Rules 69.1, 69.3 and 69.4); or (ii) A play that results in a “NO GOAL” call on the ice despite the puck having entered the net, where the On-Ice Officials have determined that the attacking team was guilty of “Interference on the Goalkeeper” but where the attacking team claims: (A) there was no actual contact of any kind initiated by an attacking Player with the goalkeeper; (B) the attacking Player was pushed, shoved or fouled by a defending Player which caused the attacking Player to come into contact with the goalkeeper; or (C) the attacking Player’s positioning within the goal crease did not impair the goalkeeper’s ability to defend his goal and, in fact, had no discernable impact on the play.

 

Rule 38.3 – League Initiated Challenge

In the final minute of play in the 3rd Period and at any point in Overtime (Regular Season and Playoffs), the NHL Situation Room will initiate the review of any scenario that would otherwise be subject to a Coach’s Challenge.

The NHL Situation Room will continue to be responsible for the review of all goals subject to Video Review under Rule 37. Where a Coach’s Challenge is available on a scoring play potentially involving “Off-Side,” a “Missed Game Stoppage Event in the Offensive Zone” or “Interference on the Goalkeeper,” Hockey Operations will, as an initial and threshold matter, determine that the puck entered the net legally before the play will be subject to further review by means of a Coach’s Challenge (or, in the final minute of play or in Overtime, a review initiated by Hockey Operations).

If a team requests a Coach’s Challenge but Video Review under Rule 37 renders such Challenge unnecessary, then the Challenge will have been deemed not to have been made.

 

Rule 38.4 – Process for Initiating a Coach’s Challenge

All Coach’s Challenges must be initiated by notice verbally communicated to a Referee prior to the center ice face-off following a GOAL or, in the case of a NO GOAL call by reason of “Interference on the Goalkeeper,” prior to the resumption of play. Teams may not unduly delay the resumption of play while evaluating whether or not to initiate a Coach’s Challenge. Any such delay or delay tactics may result in the denial of a right to Challenge and, at the discretion of the Referee, may also result in a minor penalty for “Delaying the Game” under Rule 63.

In order to expedite the review process, Coaches initiating a Coach’s Challenge are required to provide to the Referee, with reasonable specificity, both the reason for their Challenge (i.e., the actual infraction that is being claimed) and the approximate time on the clock when the purported infraction transpired. Failure to provide this information with reasonable specificity may result in the denial of a right to Challenge.

NOTE: Only one Coach’s Challenge per team per stoppage will be permitted.

 

Rule 38.5 – Process for Reviewing a Coach’s Challenge

The League will make available in all arenas suitable technology (for example, a handheld tablet or a television or computer monitor) that will allow the On-Ice Officials, in conjunction with the NHL Situation Room, to review video replays of the play giving rise to the Coach’s Challenge (or, in the final minute of play or in Overtime, the play that caused the NHL Situation Room to initiate the review). To the extent practical and possible, the replays made available to the On-Ice Officials will be the same replays that are being utilized by the NHL Situation Room.

Once a Coach’s Challenge has been initiated (or, in the final minute of play or in Overtime, a review is initiated by the NHL Situation Room), the NHL Situation Room will immediately establish contact with the On-Ice Official(s) responsible for the call (or non-call) on the ice via the headset and will inquire and discuss with the On-Ice Official(s), prior to the On-Ice Official reviewing any video, the following: (i) the On-Ice Official’s “final” call on the ice; and (ii) what the On-Ice Official(s) observed on the play.

During all games (Regular Season and Playoffs), the NHL Situation Room will be staffed with at least one retired On-Ice Official to assist in the review of Coach’s Challenges (including those initiated by the NHL Situation Room), and such retired Official will be involved both in communicating with the On-Ice Officials via the headset and with providing input to the Hockey Operations person responsible for making the “final” decision by the NHL Situation Room.

The on-ice call will then be reviewed simultaneously by the appropriate On-Ice Official(s) at ice level and by the staff in the NHL Situation Room using any and all replays at their disposal. After their joint review and consultation, the NHL Situation Room will render the “final” decision on whether to uphold or overturn the original call on the ice. Once a decision is made, the Referee will inform the Penalty Timekeeper/Public Address Announcer and will make the announcement on the ice.

 

Rule 38.6 – Right to Initiate a Coach’s Challenge

Teams may initiate a Coach’s Challenge on appropriate plays at any time during the game except during the final minute of play in Regulation time or at any time during Overtime (Regular Season and Playoffs), at which point the exclusive right to initiate a review of any scenario that would otherwise be subject to a Coach’s Challenge shifts to the NHL Situation Room.

 

Rule 38.7 – Results of a Successful Coach’s Challenge

In cases where a Challenge has been initiated for an “Off-Side Play Leading to a Goal” or a “Missed Game Stoppage Event in the Offensive Zone Leading to a Goal” (either by a team or by the NHL Situation Room), and a determination is made that the GOAL call on the ice should be overturned, the goal will be disallowed and the clock will be re-set to the time at which the play should have been stopped for the missed infraction. In such cases, a face-off will ensue in the ice location where it would have otherwise occurred had the on-ice infraction been called properly. If one or more penalties (minor or major) are assessed between the time of the missed infraction and the video review that disallows the apparent goal, the offending team(s) (and responsible Player(s)) will still be required to serve the penalty(ies) identified and assessed, and the time of the penalty(ies) will be recorded as the time at which the play should have been stopped for the missed infraction.

In cases where a Challenge has been initiated for a “GOAL” call on the ice where the defending team claims that the goal should have been disallowed due to the “Interference on the Goalkeeper,” as described in Rules 69.1, 69.3 and 69.4, and a determination is made that the call on the ice should be overturned, the goal will be disallowed and a face-off will ensue in the nearest neutral zone faceoff spot outside the attacking zone. The video review process on these plays (whether initiated by way of a Coach’s Challenge or by the NHL Situation Room in the final minute of play or in Overtime) will be utilized exclusively for purposes of overturning a “GOAL” call on the ice – it will not be utilized for any other purpose, including, specifically, for assessing minor or major penalties for Goalkeeper Interference.

In cases where a Challenge has been initiated for a “NO GOAL” call on the ice despite the puck having entered the net, where the OnIce Officials have determined that the attacking team was guilty of “Interference on the Goalkeeper,” and a determination is made that the call on the ice should be overturned, the goal will be allowed and a face-off will ensue at center ice.

 

Rule 38.8 – Results of an Unsuccessful Coach’s Challenge

If a team initiates a Coach’s Challenge for any of the enumerated scenarios in Rule 38.2 above and such Challenge does not result in the original call on the ice being overturned, the team exercising such Challenge shall be assessed a minor penalty (2:00) for delaying the game.

If a team that has already initiated one or more Challenges that were unsuccessful, initiates a Coach’s Challenge for any of the enumerated scenarios in Rule 38.2 above and such Challenge does not result in the original call on the ice being overturned, the team exercising such Challenge shall be assessed a double-minor penalty (4:00) for delaying the game.

 

Rule 38.9 – Applicable Standards for “Off-Side” Challenge

The standard for overturning the call in the event of a “GOAL” call on the ice is that the NHL Situation Room, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the On-Ice Official(s), determines that one or more Players on the attacking team preceded the puck into the attacking zone prior to the goal being scored and that, as a result, the play should have been stopped for an “Off-Side” infraction; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.

Goals will only be subject to review for a potential “Off-Side” infraction if the puck does not come out of the attacking zone again between the time of the “Off-Side” infraction and the time the goal is scored.

 

Rule 38.10 – Applicable Standards for “Missed Game Stoppage Event in the Offensive Zone” Challenge

The standard for overturning the call in the event of a “GOAL” call on the ice is that the NHL Situation Room, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the On-Ice Official(s), determines that the play should have been stopped but was not at some point after the puck entered the attacking zone but prior to the goal being scored; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.

Potential infractions that would require a play stoppage in the offensive zone include, but may not be limited to: Hand Pass (Rule 79); High-Sticking the Puck (Rule 80); and Puck Out of Bounds (Rule 85). Such infractions will only serve as a basis for overturning a GOAL call on the ice if video review can conclusively establish that a game stoppage event had occurred in the offensive zone and was missed by the On-Ice Official(s). Where the infraction at issue was a missed penalty call subject to the judgment or discretion of the On-Ice Official(s), such infraction cannot result in the “GOAL” call on the ice being overturned, even if upon review, the On-Ice Official(s) would have made a different call. Goals will only be reviewed for a potential “Missed Game Stoppage Event in the Offensive Zone” if the puck does not come out of the attacking zone again between the time of the “Missed Game Stoppage Event in the Offensive Zone” and the time the goal is scored.

 

Rule 38.11 – Applicable Standards for Potential “Interference on the Goalkeeper” Challenge

The standard for overturning the call in the event of a “GOAL” call on the ice is that the NHL Situation Room, after reviewing any and all replays and consulting with the On-Ice Official(s), determines that the goal should have been disallowed due to “Interference on the Goalkeeper,” as described in Rules 69.1, 69.3 and 69.4; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.

The standard for overturning the call in the event of a “NO GOAL” call on the ice is that the NHL Situation Room, after reviewing any and all replays and consulting with the OnIce Official(s), determines that the goal on the ice should have been allowed because either: (i) there was no actual contact of any kind initiated by the attacking Player with the goalkeeper; or (ii) the attacking Player was pushed, shoved or fouled by the defending Player causing the attacking Player to come into contact with the goalkeeper; or (iii) the attacking Player’s positioning within the crease did not impair the goalkeeper’s ability to defend his goal and, in fact, had no discernable impact on the play; where this standard is met, the goal will be allowed.

 

 

Rule 60.3 – Double-minor Penalty (Page 93)

When a player carries or holds any part of his stick above the shoulders and makes contact with his opponent’s neck, face or head so that injury results, in the manner of drawing blood or otherwise, the Referee shall assess a double-minor penalty. Referees making this call shall have the option (but not the obligation) to review video of the play for the purpose of confirming (or not) their original call on the ice, and, in particular, whether the stick causing the apparent injury was actually the stick of the Player being penalized. Such reviews will be conducted exclusively by the Referee(s) on the ice in consultation with other On-Ice Officials, as appropriate, using the technology (for example, a handheld tablet or television or computer monitor) provided for the Official(s) at ice level. On any such review, the only contact between the On-Ice Official(s) and the NHL Situation Room shall be for the sole purpose of ensuring the Referee is receiving any and all video he may request and that he has access to all the appropriate replay angles he may need to review the penalty call. There shall be no other consultation between the Referee and the NHL Situation Room, or with any other non-game participant.

 

 

Rule 63.6 – Awarded Goal (Page 97)

If the goal post is deliberately displaced by a goalkeeper during the course of a “breakaway,” a goal will be awarded to the non-offending team.

 

 

Rule 63.7 – No Line Change (Pages 97-98)

In the event that the goal post is displaced accidentally by a defending player causing a stoppage in play, the ensuing face-off shall be conducted at one of the end zone face-off spots in the defending zone. The offending team shall not be permitted to make any player substitutions prior to the face-off. However, a team shall be permitted to make a player substitution to replace a goalkeeper who had been substituted for an extra attacker, to replace an injured player, or when a penalty has been assessed which affects the on-ice strength of either team.

In the event that the puck is shot into the end zone by the attacking team from their own side of the center red line, and the opposing goalkeeper freezes the puck resulting in a stoppage of play, the ensuing face-off shall be conducted at one of the end zone faceoff spots in the goalkeeper’s defending zone. The defending team shall not be permitted to make any player substitutions prior to the face-off. However, a team shall be permitted to make a player substitution to replace an injured player, or when a penalty has been assessed which affects the on-ice strength of either team.

In addition, for both situations outlined in this section, for the ensuing face-off in the defending zone, the attacking team will have the choice of which end zone dot the face-off will take place.

 

 

Rule 76.2 – Face-off Locations (Page 114)

The team awarded the power-play will have the choice of which end zone dot the face-off will take place at to start the power-play.

 

 

Rule 81.2 – Face-Off Location (Page 124)

Following an icing, the attacking team will have the choice of which end zone dot the face-off will take place.

 

 

Rule 85.1 – Puck Out of Bounds (Page 133)

When a puck goes outside the playing area at either end or either side of the rink, strikes any obstacles above the playing surface other than the boards or glass, causes the glass, lighting, timing device or the supports to break, it shall be faced-off at the nearest face-off spot in the zone from where it was shot or deflected out of play.

 

 

Rule 85.5 – Face-Off Location (Page 134)

Should any player cause the puck to go out of play or become unplayable in any zone, the face-off shall take place at the face-off spot in the zone from which the puck was shot. If deflected out of play, at the nearest face-off spot in the zone where it deflected out of play.

For a puck that is unplayable due to being lodged in the netting or as a result of it being frozen between opposing players, the resulting face-off shall be at either of the adjacent face-off spots or at the nearest face-off spot in the zone from which the puck was shot, unless otherwise covered in these rules.

If the attacking team shoots the puck into the zone and a delayed off-side is indicated, or if the attacking team commits a game flow infraction such as contacting the puck with a high-stick or batting the puck with a glove (causing a stoppage of play), the ensuing face-off shall be in the neutral zone outside the offending team’s attacking zone.

 

PRESS RELEASE WRITTEN BY NHL PUBLIC RELATIONS; COURTESY NHLmedia.com