Your network for multiple sports and entertainment

High School Bounce

2015-2016 High School Bounce




High School Bounce marks its sixth season this year! Check back in the coming weeks for game schedules and times.

Click Here for Game

Click here for season schedule and archived games.

What We Cover

Today is

January 2019
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

‘Richard “The Guitarman” (Entertainment)’ Articles

Daily Almanac for Wednesday, December 26, 2018: Day 360 of the Year

DAILY ALMANAC WRITTEN BY & COURTESY OF www.almanac.com

 

(courtesy GoBreck.com)

 

BOXING DAY (CANADA)

This holiday derives from the Old English custom of giving Christmas “boxes” to tradesmen, postmen, and servants. The original boxes were usually made of earthenware and contained money, which could be retrieved only by breaking the boxes open. These days, a gift of money is usually contained in a greeting card and given before the holiday. Where celebrated (Great Britain, Canada, and Australia), Boxing Day is welcomed as a quiet day of recuperation from the season’s hectic festivities. It is also the biggest day of the year for soccer playoffs.

Every Year

1860s

1890s

1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1970s

2000s

2010s

 

 

Merry Christmas from the Staff at Megasportsnews.com!

(courtesy Localhop)

Daily Almanac for Christmas Day, Tuesday, December 25, 2018: Day 359 of the Year

DAILY ALMANAC WRITTEN BY & COURTESY OF www.almanac.com

 

(courtesy history.com)

CHRISTMAS DAY

Christmas Day is a Christian holiday commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ. Although the actual date of Christ’s birth is unknown, it has been celebrated on December 25 since the 4th century. Christmas is also extensively celebrated by non-Christians as a seasonal holiday, on which popular traditions such as gift-giving, feasting, and caroling take place. In ancient times, Celts divided the year into four sections marked by “quarter days” — the days of the two solstices and two equinoxes. The winter solstice, the shortest and darkest day of the year, was the fourth quarter day. It signaled a celebratory time, as the Sun began to reemerge and the land experienced a rebirth. Gradually, to conform more closely to the liturgical year of the Christian church, the fourth quarter day merged easily with the Christian celebration of the birth of Christ. As Christianity began to spread in the 4th century, the Christmas feast day was set on December 25 by Pope Julius I to align with the Roman pagan holiday Dies natalis solis invicti, “the birth of the invincible Sun.” Today’s rich mosaic of Christmas customs dates back through the ages. Evergreen branches were used to symbolize life in ancient solstice festivals, as they stayed green in winter. This tradition was absorbed by Christians, who interpreted the evergreens as the Paradise tree and began decorating them with apples. The candles and lights associated with Christmas, meant to symbolize guiding beacons for the Christ child, may have evolved from the Yule log, which was lit to entice the Sun to return as part of the jol (Yule) festival in pagan Scandinavia.

Every Year

1490s

1630s

1770s

1820s

1860s

1890s

1900s

1920s

1940s

1950s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

 

 

Daily Almanac for Sunday, December 23, 2018: Day 357 of the Year

ALMANAC WRITTEN BY & COURTESY OF www.almanc.com

 

(courtesy You Tube)

1670s

1780s

1800s

1820s

1880s

1920s

1940s

1960s

1980s

2000s

 

Almanac for Wednesday, December 19, 2018: Day 353 of the Year

ALMANAC WRITTEN BY & COURTESY OF www.almanac.com

 

(courtesy WNYHA)

EMBER DAYS

Upcoming Ember Days are December 19, 21, and 22. Ember Days occur four times a year at the start of each season. In Latin, they are known as the quattuor anni tempora (the “four seasons of the year”). Traditionally observed by some Christian denominations, each set of Ember Days is three days, kept on a successive Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday. These three days are set apart for fasting, abstinence, and prayer. The first of these four times comes in winter, after the Feast of St. Lucia, December 13; the second set comes with the First Sunday in Lent; the third set comes after Whitsunday/Pentecost Sunday; the four and last set comes after the Feast of the Holy Cross, September 14. Their dates can be remembered by this old mnemonic: “Sant Crux, Lucia, Cineres, Charismata Dia Ut sit in angaria quarta sequens feria.” Which means: “Holy Cross, Lucy, Ash Wednesday, Pentecost, are when the quarter holidays follow.” Folklore has it that the weather on each of the three days foretells the weather for three successive months. As with much folklore, this is grounded in some common sense since the beginning of the four seasons cue the changes in weather as well as a shift in how we keep harmony with the Earth and respect our stewardship of the Earth, our “garden of Eden.”

 

1680s

1840s

1870s

1880s

1910s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

2000s

 

 

 Page 5 of 98  « First  ... « 3  4  5  6  7 » ...  Last »